Tag Archives: Novels

Possible Page to Projector Predictions

7 Jul

Hollywood’s risk management strategy decreasingly supports originality and favors investing in existing franchises over unfamiliar content. Hence theaters are flooded with regular installments of a movie series. If movies aren’t sequels, prequels, inbetweequels, or reboots, then they’re probably coming from comic books that haven’t been filmed yet. Comics are becoming the preferred source material to mine for storylines. I’ll be complaining about this for years to come. However sometimes movies are based on a “book” these not-comic books are sometimes referred to as “novels”. Since I know a lot more about novels than I do about comics I predict that the following novels will be coming to a screen sometime soon. I haven’t done research on this and don’t plan to, just going from my gut.

 

Dr. Sleep

 

Dr. Sleep – This will be a movie, guaranteed. The author, Stephen King has had almost all his writing adapted for the screen. King has described his work as the junk-food of literature. I’ll confirm this. Like a Burger King Whopper that delivers a manufactured pleasing taste while having negative nutritional value, King’s books deliver cheap thrills and clichés and zero intellectual stimulation. He uses the same ingredients for every story; substance abuse, psychics, paranormal activity, and handicapped characters. Furthermore people buy his stuff on a regular basis because his name is ubiquitous and familiar not because it is worth reading. Although King hated Stanley Kubrick’s The Shining, it is one of the best movies ever made, going far above the source material. Dr. Sleep’s selling point is it’s the sequel to The Shining. Dr. Sleep is the story of an adult Danny Torrance, he’s an alcoholic seeing ghosts and other psychic shit (what a surprise). The villains in this book aren’t threatening and are almost comical stereotypes. As far as the writing goes, if you divide your book into parts, then chapters, then sections, get over yourself. Excessively segmenting up your book only proves that you have a giant ego and demonstrates how your story doesn’t fit together. But Hollywood loves sequels and loves King so expect to fall asleep watching Dr. Sleep sometime soon.

 

Spider Book

 

This Book is Full of Spiders, Seriously Don’t Touch It – Another sequel but this time it’s a good one. Author David Wong’s previous book John Dies At The End is a great read. But the structure and pacing is not like most novels and overall the book is quite unfilmable. They tried anyway and the John Dies At The End movie was unsatisfying but not a complete waste of time, it had some interesting and funny parts. This Book Is Full of Spiders benefits from smoother pacing and having the classic novel structure while every scene in the book could be easily filmed with minimal CG effects. The story is like a zombie parody that’s genuinely intense and suspenseful with a hilarious blend of dark and sarcastic comedy. The Zombie movie trend is wearing itself out, so it’s a perfect time to mock the format. The book accomplishes this, it’s about an outbreak vs quarantine conflict where everyone mistakenly thinks the problem is zombies because zombies are so huge in pop culture. Plus it’s a standalone story independent of its predecessor, so audiences don’t have to be familiar with John Dies At The End. It’s hard to describe how awesome the movie is that exists in my head called “This Movie Is Full Of Spiders, Seriously Don’t Watch It”. Or why I assume someone else could easily make said movie the exact way I know it should be. Just read the book and see for yourself.

Devil In The White City

The Devil in The White City – Remember that movie From Hell? It starred Johnny Depp and was about Jack The Ripper. What if another serial killer was murdering people before Jack The Ripper? Someone who slayed a great many more victims, in more ways, whose motivations were even more sinister. What if the killer was an American living in Chicago prowling the 1893 World’s Fair? Doesn’t that sound like an amazing story? Well it happened, The Devil in the White City recounts the true story of America’s…nay, society’s first documented serial killer and better yet they actually caught the bastard. This movie would make a great cop and criminal story with a backdrop of the 1893 World’s Fair a.k.a. The White City. The movie could highlight the optimism Chicago felt hosting the World’s Fair. Organizers went to extremes making it the grandest most modern spectacle of the 19th century, boasting electric lights, the largest enclosed space in existence, and the world’s first Ferris Wheel. Only to have their white city darkened by a killer who’d built his own three story “murder castle” to better execute his victims. It’s all well documented so the movie should just stick to the facts. The Devil in the White City could be a perfect juxtaposition of the opulent with the creepy. God I want to see this movie.

So I guess that just about does it. The book most likely to make it to the screen is the one that I have the least interest in seeing, maybe if it is some cable channel’s shitty made for TV movie I’ll watch Dr. Sleep for free. This Book Is Full of Spiders is probably too scary to make since the first movie wasn’t very popular. But there’s hope, because I ended up going back on my word and did a tiny amount of research and supposedly Leonardo DiCaprio has the movie rights to Devil In The White City. That may just be an internet rumor from a year ago but it’s better than nothing.

I go through a lot of books so depending on the response this gets I may try to churn out more literary based stupid opinions written poorly, so any feedback is encouraged.

Carl Wells

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There’s Some Not Good Parts in This, But Just Keep Reading

15 Feb

Stevie So-dee-berg is retiring because he thinks the time for the medium of cinema has past. Quentin Unchained thinks that digital projection is the same as watching TV in public. An Entourage movie is in the works. There is so much negativity toward movies, and the main culprit is brilliant television. The megaplexes have been abandoned by thinking adults and the tweens have gotten the keys to the kingdom and converted it to an asylum. Every film made today will ultimately ask at some point in the process, “Will fans of Selena Gomez pay to see this movie?” The future of cinema does not look bright, but is this the death rattle or just the darkest moment right before dawn?

 Diptic

Here’s my stupid opinion about the whole thing; TV is great now, yes, but it’s a different medium. In the same way that a short story is a different medium than a novel or a poem. And I think those same distinctions may need to apply to the current age of visual entertainment. Television Series are like novels, movies are like short stories and short films then must be like poems (but nobody reads poetry and fewer people watch short films, so I have no obligation to talk about either of them). So, television shows are the perfect place to examine character(s) and deal with broader, far-reaching concepts. A place where there can be a ton of details and subplots and show creators can really do a lot of things. A movie is a better place to look at a specific event and how it affects a main character. And just like the difference between a novel and short story, the short story doesn’t allow for sub par bits, everything has to be perfect to be effective, but novels and TV shows can go full seasons where people will say, “Season X wasn’t that good, but get through that and it gets really good again.” Can you imagine someone saying the equivalent about a movie? No way, they’d just say it was a bad movie.

It’s harder to make a good movie than it is to make a good TV show. And that isn’t meant to take away anything from the all of the brilliant work people are doing with television, but the medium makes it easier to build characters over a ten-hour long episodes, than the first twenty minutes of hundred minute film. For the longest time becoming a filmmaker meant a lot of learning what was important and vital to telling a story. Everyone in film wants to, or should want to, tell personal honest stories, and those types of stories require a lot of information to build enough of a connection with the audience. Now with the full potential of television, and not television, HBO, allow the telling of the stories in more expanded form the artist doesn’t need to adapt to the medium, the medium has adapted to the artist. The craft of filmmaking is being replaced by the Marvel, and soon enough Star Wars, universes, which in all fairness are really just very expensive hundred-twenty minute serials with occasional cross overs.  Yes, TV is changing movies and the capitalist geniuses in the Disney head office trying to make movies just bigger versions of television, but there is still room for movies

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On the surface, TV looks closer to the artist’s vision that movie ever could be, and there was a whole generation of filmmakers whose goal was to write and make movies with the novel as inspiration. All they people that they inspired are now making amazing novel-esque television shows. Cinema still has life, but what it needs right now is the creator of a brilliant TV show to make a brilliant, stand-alone, non-franchise, original film and all the magic will be restored to cinema. Come on show creators, don’t concede cinema to calculated gloss of Christopher Nolan and David Fincher.

Diptic-1

-C. Charles